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Motorcycle Safety

Motorcycle

 

Motorcycle Safety is everyone's business. The motorcycle driver, the passenger, and the cars on the road...they all share responsibility.

 


 

Cycle Gear at the Marine Corps Exchange

 

 

Car and Truck Drivers

QUICK TIPS: Ten Things All Car & Truck Drivers Should Know
About Motorcycles

1. There are a lot more cars and trucks than motorcycles on the road, and some drivers don't "recognize" a motorcycle; they ignore it (usually unintentionally). Look for motorcycles, especially when checking traffic at an intersection.

2. Because of its small size, a motorcycle may look farther away than it is. It may also be difficult to judge a motorcycle’s speed. When checking traffic to turn at an intersection or into (or out of) a driveway, predict a motorcycle is closer than it looks.

3. Because of its small size, a motorcycle can be easily hidden in a car’s blind spots (door/roof pillars) or masked by objects or backgrounds outside a car (bushes, fences, bridges, etc). Take an extra moment to thoroughly check traffic, whether you're changing lanes or turning at intersections.

4. Because of its small size a motorcycle may seem to be moving faster than it really is. Don't assume all motorcyclists are speed demons.

5. Motorcyclists often slow by downshifting or merely rolling off the throttle, thus not activating the brake light. Allow more following distance, say 3 or 4 seconds. At intersections, predict a motorcyclist may slow down without visual warning.

6. Turn signals on a motorcycle usually are not self-canceling, thus some riders, (especially beginners) sometimes forget to turn them off after a turn or lane change. Make sure a motorcycle's signal is for real.

7. Motorcyclists often adjust position within a lane to be seen more easily and to minimize the effects of road debris, passing vehicles, and wind. Understand that motorcyclists adjust lane position for a purpose, not to be reckless or show off or to allow you to share the lane with them.

8. Maneuverability is one of a motorcycle's better characteristics, especially at slower speeds and with good road conditions, but don't expect a motorcyclist to always be able to dodge out of the way.

9. Stopping distance for motorcycles is nearly the same as for cars, but slippery pavement makes stopping quickly difficult. Allow more following distance behind a motorcycle because it can't always stop "on a dime."

10. When a motorcycle is in motion, don't think of it as motorcycle; think of it as a person.

Facts and Statistics

Motorcycles and Alcohol

  • Impaired driving is one of America’s most-often-committed and deadliest crimes. Overall in 2006, more than 13,000 people were killed in highway crashes involving a driver or motorcycle operator with an illegal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 or higher.

  • The percentage of legally intoxicated motorcycle riders in fatal crashes is greater than the percentage of legally intoxicated drivers of passenger cars, SUV’s or pick-up trucks.  The percentages of drivers with BAC levels .08 g/dL or higher in fatal crashes in 2006 were 27 percent for motorcycle operators, 23 percent for passenger cars, and 24 percent for light trucks. The percentage of drivers with BAC levels .08 g/dL or higher in fatal crashes was the lowest for large trucks (1%).

  • Alcohol affects those skills essential to riding a motorcycle—balance and coordination. So it plays a particularly big role in motorcycle fatalities.

  • In 2006, 27 percent of all fatally injured motorcycle operators had BAC levels of .08 or higher. An additional 7 percent had lower alcohol levels (BAC .01 to .07).

  • Forty-one percent of the 2,007 motorcycle operators who died in single-vehicle crashes in 2006 had BAC levels of .08 or higher.

  • Motorcycle operators killed in traffic crashes at night were three times more likely to have BAC levels of .08 g/dL or higher than those killed during the day (43% and 12%, respectively).

  • Motorcycle operators age 30 to 49 who are killed in fatal crashes have the highest rates of alcohol involvement.

  • Far too many people still don’t understand that alcohol, drugs and motorcycle riding don’t mix. Impaired riding is no accident—nor is it a victimless crime.

  • Many motorcyclists believe they only hurt themselves if they are in a crash, but the pain, suffering, and financial costs often extend to family members, friends, employers, insurance companies, and others.

  • Riding a motorcycle while impaired is not worth the risk of losing your life, killing an innocent person, ruining your bike or going to jail.

  • The consequences of drunk riding are serious and real. The trauma and financial costs of a crash or an arrest for riding while impaired can be significant.

  • Violators often face jail time, the loss of their driver’s license, higher insurance rates, and dozens of other unanticipated expenses from attorney fees, other fines and court costs, towing and repairs, lost time at work, etc.

Motorcycle

 

Accidents

  • In 2006, motorcycle rider fatalities increased for the ninth straight year.

  • During 2006, 4,810 motorcyclists lost their lives in fatal highway crashes.

  • That means motorcycle riders were involved in more than one out of nine of all U.S. road fatalities during 2006.

  • Fifty-five percent of all fatalities in motorcycle crashes in 2006 involved another vehicle in addition to the motorcycle in the crash.

  • In 2006, 93 percent of all two-vehicle crashes involving a motorcycle and a passenger vehicle in which the motorcycle operator died occurred on non-interstate roadways.

  • In 2006, 51 percent of all two-vehicle crashes involving a motorcycle and a passenger vehicle in which the motorcycle operator died were intersection crashes.

  • In two-vehicle motorcycle crashes involving a motorcycle and another type of vehicle, in 40 percent of the crashes the other vehicle was turning left when the motorcycle was going straight, passing, or overtaking the vehicle.

- Facts from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

 


Links and Resources

Motorcycle Safety Courses

Classes will be held at one of the two ranges located at Base Safety Blg 58 on main side and at Camp Johnson Blg M147. Please call
910-451-5903 or go to www.navymotorcyclerider.com for
more information and to register for classes.

 

Basic Rider Course (BRC)

20 Hours

 

Prerequisites
Parental permission (for students under 18), ability to balance a bike, and a completed waiver form (first class).


Experienced Rider Course (ERC)

8 Hours

 

Prerequisites
This course is designed for cruiser type motorcycles.  Students must own street legal motorcycle (loaners accepted with written authority to operate) and pass the T-clock inspection by the instructor. Students must also provide proof of ownership and insurance, motorcycle license endorsement, parental permission (for students under 18), and a completed waiver form (first class).


Military Sports Rider Course (MSRC)

8 Hours

 

Prerequisites
This course is designed for sport bike type motorcycles.  Students must own street legal motorcycle (loaners accepted with written authority to operate) and pass the T-clock inspection by the instructor. Students must also provide proof of ownership and insurance, motorcycle license endorsement, parental permission
(for students under 18), and a completed waiver form (first class).

 

Marine Corps Order

1. THIS IS A COORDINATED CG II MEF AND CG MCIEAST MESSAGE. PER REF A AND DECISIONS MADE AT THE 21ST EXECUTIVE SAFETY BOARD ON 6 MAY 2009, ACMC HAS DIRECTED THE ELIMINATION OF COLOR AND REFLECTIVITY REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO MOTORCYCLE OUTERWEAR AS SPECIFIED IN REF B. THIS EFFECTIVELY ELIMINATES THE REQUIREMENT TO WEAR A "MOTORCYCLE VEST" DURING DAY OR NIGHT AS WELL AS ANY QUANTIFICATION OF COLOR OR REFLECTIVITY REQUIREMENTS RELATED TO MOTORCYCLE OUTERWEAR. TO MEET ACMC'S INTENT AND PROMOTE UNIFORMITY THROUGHOUT II MEF AND MCIEAST REGARDING MOTORCYCLE PPE, REFS C AND D ARE CANCELED AND THE FOLLOWING MODIFICATIONS TO EXISTING POLICY ARE EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY. DEVIATIONS AND LOCAL INTERPRETATION OF THIS POLICY AND AMPLIFYING GUIDANCE ARE NEITHER DESIRED NOR AUTHORIZED.

A. WHILE IN UNIFORM, THE FOLLOWING PPE IS MANDATORY FOR ALL MILITARY PERSONNEL OPERATING OR RIDING AS A PASSENGER ON A MOTORCYCLE ON OR OFF MCIEAST INSTALLATIONS.

(1) A PROPERLY FASTENED (UNDER THE CHIN) PROTECTIVE HELMET WHICH MEETS THE STANDARDS OF THE SNELL MEMORIAL FOUNDATION (SNELL), THE AMERICAN NATIONAL STANDARDS INSTITUTE (ANSI), OR THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (DOT).
(2) IMPACT OR SHATTER RESISTANT GOGGLES OR FULL-FACE SHIELD ATTACHED TO THE HELMET. A WINDSHIELD, EYEGLASSES OR FAIRING ALONE IS NOT CONSIDERED PROPER EYE PROTECTION.
(3) HARD-SOLED SHOES WITH HEELS. THE USE OF LEATHER BOOTS OR OVER THE ANKLE SHOES IS ENCOURAGED.
(4) PROPERLY WORN LONG-SLEEVED SHIRT WITH SLEEVES ROLLED DOWN OR JACKET, LONG LEGGED TROUSERS AND FULL-FINGERED GLOVES OR MITTENS. TO CLARIFY, CIVILIAN ATTIRE, SUCH AS LONG-SLEEVED T-SHIRTS OR JACKETS MAY NOT BE WORN OVER THE UNIFORM.
(5) PER REF E, MARINES ARE AUTHORIZED AND ENCOURAGED TO WEAR A MOTORCYCLE-RIDING JACKET CONSTRUCTED OF ABRASION RESISTANT MATERIALS SUCH AS LEATHER, KEVLAR, AND/OR CORDURA AND CONTAINING IMPACT-ABSORBING PADDING OVER THE UNIFORM WHILE ON THE MOTORCYCLE. THE MOTORCYCLE-RIDING JACKET MUST BE REMOVED AS SOON AS THE MARINE DISMOUNTS THE MOTORCYCLE. THE MOTORCYCLE-RIDING JACKET MUST NOT CONTAIN GRAPHICS OR TEXT CONSIDERED INAPPROPRIATE WITH THE IMAGE OF THE MARINE CORPS.

B. WHILE IN CIVILIAN ATTIRE, THE FOLLOWING PPE IS MANDATORY FOR ALL PERSONNEL OPERATING OR RIDING AS A PASSENGER ON A MOTORCYCLE ON MCIEAST INSTALLATIONS, AND ALL MILITARY PERSONNEL ON AND OFF MCIEAST INSTALLATIONS:

(1) A PROPERLY FASTENED (UNDER THE CHIN) PROTECTIVE HELMET WHICH MEETS THE STANDARDS OF THE SNELL MEMORIAL FOUNDATION (SNELL), THE AMERICAN NATIONAL STANDARDS INSTITUTE (ANSI), OR THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (DOT).
(2) IMPACT OR SHATTER RESISTANT GOGGLES OR FULL-FACE SHIELD ATTACHED TO THE HELMET. A WINDSHIELD, EYEGLASSES OR FAIRING ALONE IS NOT CONSIDERED PROPER EYE PROTECTION.
(3) HARD-SOLED SHOES WITH HEELS. THE USE OF LEATHER BOOTS OR OVER THE ANKLE SHOES IS ENCOURAGED, BUT NOT MANDATORY.
(4) PROPERLY WORN LONG-SLEEVED SHIRT WITH SLEEVES ROLLED DOWN OR JACKET, LONG-LEGGED TROUSERS AND FULL-FINGERED GLOVES OR MITTENS. MOTORCYCLE-RIDING JACKETS AND PANTS CONSTRUCTED OF ABRASION RESISTANT MATERIALS SUCH AS LEATHER, KEVLAR, AND/OR CORDURA AND CONTAINING IMPACT-ABSORBING PADDING ARE STRONGLY ENCOURAGED.

C. THE PPE FOR MOTORCYCLE OPERATORS DURING OFF-ROAD OPERATIONS WHILE IN UNIFORM OR CIVILIAN ATTIRE SHOULD ALSO INCLUDE KNEE AND SHIN GUARDS, OFF-ROAD BOOTS OR MARINE CORPS BOOTS, AND PADDED FULL-FINGERED GLOVES.

2. ANY MILITARY SERVICE MEMBER ABOARD A MCIEAST INSTALLATION WHO VIOLATES THE TERMS OF THIS POLICY IS SUBJECT TO PUNITIVE ACTION UNDER THE UNIFORM CODE OF MILITARY JUSTICE (UCMJ) FOR VIOLATION OF THESE PPE REQUIREMENTS. ANY SUCH PERSON WHO OPERATES A MOTORCYCLE WITH A PASSENGER WHO IS NOT IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF THIS POLICY IS ALSO SUBJECT TO PUNISHMENT FOR VIOLATION OF THESE PPE REQUIREMENTS.

3. TEMPORARY MOTORCYCLE REGISTRATION. MCIEAST INSTALLATION COMMANDERS MAY AUTHORIZE PROPERLY LICENSED MOTORCYCLE OPERATORS TO OPERATE THEIR VEHICLES ON THE INSTALLATION FOR A BRIEF PERIOD NOT TO EXCEED 30 DAYS WHILE THEY COMPLETE THE FIRST AVAILABLE OPERATOR SAFETY CLASS.

 

ALMAR 014/08

From ALMAR 014/08:


3.  MOTORCYCLE FATALITIES CONTINUE TO RISE AT AN ALARMING RATE.  IN FY07, WE LOST 19 MARINES IN MOTORCYCLE MISHAPS - MORE THAN AT ANY PREVIOUS TIME IN OUR HISTORY.  RECENT TRENDS INDICATE A CULTURE OF NONCOMPLIANCE AMONG YOUNGER RIDERS, IN PARTICULAR SPORT-BIKE RIDERS. THESE TRENDS FALL SHORT OF THE PROFESSIONALISM I EXPECT FROM ALL MARINES.  IN RESPONSE, THE FOLLOWING ACTIONS ARE DIRECTED.

A.  MOTORCYCLE OWNERSHIP IS A SIGNIFICANT RESPONSIBILITY.  PRIOR TO PURCHASING A MOTORCYCLE, ALL MARINES WILL CONSULT WITH THEIR LEADERSHIP IN ADVANCE TO BE CERTAIN THAT THEY ARE AWARE OF THE RESPONSIBILITIES THAT COME WITH OWNERSHIP.  THESE RESPONSIBILITIES
INCLUDE PROPER REGISTRATION, TRAINING, AND MANDATORY WEAR OF PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE). 

B.  ALL MARINES WHO PRESENTLY OWN OR PURCHASE A MOTORCYCLE, WHETHER OR NOT THEY INTEND TO RIDE ON BASE, WILL PERSONALLY REPORT THEIR OWNERSHIP TO THEIR COMMANDING OFFICERS/OFFICERS-IN-CHARGE WITHIN 48 HOURS.  THE FAILURE OF A MARINE TO REPORT OWNERSHIP IS PUNISHABLE UNDER THE UCMJ.  FURTHER, THESE MARINES WILL APPROPRIATELY REGISTER THE MOTORCYCLE WITH THE PROVOST MARSHAL'S OFFICE ON THE INSTALLATION.

C.  WHEN OWNERSHIP OR PURCHASE OF A MOTORCYCLE IS REPORTED, COMMANDERS SHALL VERIFY WITH THE PROVOST MARSHAL'S OFFICE THAT THE MARINE HOLDS A VALID DRIVER'S LICENSE WITH A MOTORCYCLE ENDORSEMENT AND THAT THEY HAVE COMPLETED OR ARE SCHEDULED TO ATTEND THE MOTORCYCLE SAFETY FOUNDATION BASIC RIDERS COURSE (BRC) AT THE EARLIEST OPPORTUNITY, AND THAT THE MARINE KNOWS WHAT PPE IS REQUIRED WHILE RIDING.  ON INSTALLATIONS WHERE THE BRC PROVIDES A MARINE WITH THE MOTORCYCLE FOR USE IN THE COURSE, LEADERS SHALL ENCOURAGE THE MARINE TO COMPLETE THE BRC PRIOR TO THE PURCHASE.

D.  FAILURE OF A MARINE TO WEAR REQUIRED PPE WHILE RIDING A MOTORCYCLE IS PUNISHABLE UNDER THE UCMJ AND MAY ALSO BE CONSIDERED MISCONDUCT DURING LINE OF DUTY DETERMINATIONS.

 

 

 

Ride Safe

Alcohol and Motorcycles

 

QUICK TIPS: General Guidelines For Riding A Motorcycle Safely


Be visible:
• Remember that motorists often have trouble seeing motorcycles and reacting in time.
• Make sure your headlight works and is on day and night.
• Use reflective strips or decals on your clothing and on your motorcycle.
• Be aware of the blind spots cars and trucks have.
• Flash your brake light when you are slowing down and before stopping.
• If a motorist doesn’t see you, don’t be afraid to use your horn.

Dress for safety:
• Wear a quality helmet and eye protection.
• Wear bright clothing and a light-colored helmet.
• Wear leather or other thick, protective clothing.
• Choose long sleeves and pants, over-the-ankle boots, and gloves.
• Remember – the only thing between you and the road is your protective gear.

Apply effective mental strategies:
• Constantly search the road for changing conditions. Use MSF’s Search, Evaluate, Execute strategy (SEE™) to increase time and space safety margins.
• Give yourself space and time to respond to other motorists’ actions.
• Give other motorists time and space to respond to you.
• Use lane positioning to be seen; ride in the part of a lane where you are most visible.
• Watch for turning vehicles.
• Signal your next move in advance.
• Avoid weaving between lanes.
• Pretend you’re invisible, and ride extra defensively.
• Don't ride when you are tired or under the influence of alcohol or other drugs.
• Know and follow the rules of the road, and stick to the speed limit.

Know your bike and how to use it:
• Get formal training and take refresher courses.
• Call 800.446.9227 or visit www.msf-usa.org to locate the Motorcycle Safety Foundation hands-on RiderCourse™ nearest you.
• Practice. Develop your riding techniques before going into heavy traffic. Know how to handle your bike in conditions such as wet or sandy roads, high winds, and uneven surfaces.